RARE BULB NURSERY. LATVIA
by Dr. Janis Ruksans & Liga Popova

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197
A most exciting species with pale but brilliant turquoise blue flowers with delicate slightly darker veins. I don’t know of any other crocus species with a similar colour. Rare in cultivation but not very difficult, can be grown outside even here; in summer pots must be brought outside. A very limited stock.
18.00 EUR
Not available
198
It is one of colour forms of C. biflorus from Italy where this crocus is distributed along all Apennines. Flowers in this population generally are blue, only very few albinos were seen between them at Basilicata. They mostly are distinctly striped on outside. Easy in garden and pots.
8.00 EUR
 
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199
C. bowlesianus is very colourful (especially the forms with black anthers) and it has proved to be a very good grower, regularly producing seed and increasing well by corm division. My stock is still quite small, so I plant it only in pots.
20.00 EUR
 
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200
The most unusual feature of Crocus candidus in the wild is the production of only one wide leaf per corm even in flowering individuals. Its flowers are almost invariably white. The intraspecific variability is expressed on the flower segment exteriors in the form of speckling or striping of differing intensity. Very limited stock.
12.00 EUR
 
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201
Crocus chrysanthus is one of the best-known and most popular crocuses with gardeners. Its bright yellow flowers shine in the garden from afar. Some of C. chrysanthus s.l. forms are widely used in breeding and there have been raised many lovely cultivars. Offered form was collected at Greek Macedonia and most likely belongs to type form. Note the position of stigma which in typical chrysanthus from Europe mostly well surpasses anthers or less often is level with their tips.
5.00 EUR
 
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202
Turkish so named "chrysanthus" belongs to several different species, many still are not published, but they all has stigma ending below or at tips of anthers and not overtop them as in European plants. Offered sample was collected between Hadim and Bozkir, around Gevne Beli, at altitude c.1800 m during my first trip to Turkey.
5.00 EUR
 
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203
This beautifull light blue crocus has prominent deep purple stripes over flower segments back and occasionally has black connective in anthers. It is growing around Akseki and formerly was known as one of many so named "isauricus" species. True isauricus is growing far to the East and is extremely rare in cultivation.
15.00 EUR
 
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204
Most stocks in the trade offered as C. crewei with the true species share only the black anthers and as a rule are autumn blooming C. melantherus. Some other species from W Turkey with black in anthers sometimes are offered under this name, too. Plants offered here by me are true species, some corms of which were collected in Denizli Province (TULA-011) and later carefully multiplied, but still the stock is very limited.
25.00 EUR
Not available
205
This one stock was collected just near its locus classicus and it is quite different from Greek populations having flowers from almost white to pale yellow colour, sometimes looking intermediate between C. jablanicensis and Greek forms of C. cvijicii, what now has name C. gramensis..
15.00 EUR
Not available
206
This tiny species from Cyprus belongs to my favourites for its large bright reddish orange throat and blackish purple “tongue” over the outer base of the deep violet-blue flower segments. A small plant and naturally small corms. Not very hardy, therefore protection during winter spells is very recommended.
7.00 EUR
 
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207
In general it is similar to typical C. danfordiae, but flowers in this stock are invariably white. Collected between Egirdir and Aksekir.
7.00 EUR
 
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208
Very special form of variable C. danfordiae with tiny, deep yellow flowers, distinctly flushed greyish on outer segments outside. Limited stock.
10.00 EUR
 
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209
C. danfordiae is the single crocus species where under the same name are joined plants with bluish, whitish and yellow colour and most likely under this name still are hidden several different species. Flowers are very tiny, with perianth segments only up to 1,5-2 cm long, in this stock they are pale blue. Collected on Dokuzdolanbac gec. (on map Demirci gec.), at altitude1890 m.
10.00 EUR
 
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211
It was the first crocus seen by me during my first trip to very west of Europe - Portugal. Seeing its flowers in sparse pine forest, I cried "stop" and collected some. Only later in evening I understood that it is something very special and easy separable from C. carpetanus as it was named at first look. Its corms are located deep in soil, so it has long tunic neck, flower segments are long and slender (in C. carpetanus shorter and rounded). It requires deeper planting (longer pots) and most important - acid substrate. I named it after my great friend Brian Duncan, famous daffodil breeder who invited me to join him in this trip.
30.00 EUR
 
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212
Known only from one mountain top in SW Turkey this species was named after famous Australian Crocus enthuziast Otto Fauser. I found it with the help of Ibrahim Sözen who had enough courage to drive our small car along a terrible dirt road almost up to the very top of Bencik Dağı, where the searched-for crocus was in full bloom growing together with C. fleischeri on an extremely stony slope. I think that this was one of the stoniest habitats with annulate crocuses ever seen by me. It is tolerant of cold winters but needs hot and dry summers, although I. Sözen reports that it grows easily in his near-Istanbul garden where occasional summer rains are not rare. With me it fares very well in pots that are kept all year round in the greenhouse. Very limited stock.
30.00 EUR
Not available
213
Crocus fibroannulatus in flower is somewhat similar to C. artvinensis which occurs in the same area, but is easily separable by other features. It is quite unique among the so-called ”biflorus group” species for the parallel splitting of the corm tunics. In this aspect it to some extent resembles C. aerius, but contrary to the latter C. fibroannulatus always has quite distinct, albeit thin basal rings. It is growing at altitudes of 400-1000 m, known only from three disjunct locations near the Çoruh valley and is good grower in garden as well under cover.
20.00 EUR
 
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214
This population where all individuals had more or less expressed purple striping over back of flower segments I found in Turkey when I was alone driving from Denizli to Mugla in clearings under power-line. Unusual and special! Limited stock.
15.00 EUR
 
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215
Together with C. thirkeanus it is crocus with the brightest yellow even something orange-yellow flowers, but contrary to its relative it makes something larger corms with different tunics and isn’t stoloniferous.
7.00 EUR
 
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216
One of the most unusual and variable crocuses from large complex of so named “C. chrysanthus” from near Akseki in Turkey. Flowers extremely variable, large, basically yellow but as it easily hybridises with neighbouring C. concinnus (mawii ?) between offered plants can be individuals with different back colour, blackish anthers etc. Each seedling will be different.
10.00 EUR
 
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217
I'm offering natural hybrids between both species which in addition to their special beauty are fertile and excellent for further hybridization. I can't offer special colour forms, so attached pictures show possibilities, but don't ask me some special form, they are not marked and offered plants represent full spectrum of variability.
7.00 EUR
Not available
218
This is the first selection from natural hybrids between those two species - the best increaser by splitting, It got number 17-2-ex-ex. Stock very limited.
20.00 EUR
 
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219
Flowers very large brightest yellow, even with an orange tint, very rarely nicely creamy, sweetly scented. Still a great rarity, although not very difficult in the garden. Possibly better to grow without annual lifting. Blooms late. Taxonomical status is unclear - it is very different from type Crocus cvijicii growing in North Macedonia. Plants from another Greek population at very West (Grammos Mountains) will be soon published (not by me) as Crocus gramensis. Looks very similar to it, and could be even identical - then name will be changed. This one comes from Vermio Mountain ridge.
15.00 EUR
Not available
220
Although this species is named after “bad smell” of its flowers, I never sensed this and identified by leaf features which separate it from similar C. vitellinus. Flowers are deep yellow with a distinct “waist’ but in the sun opens widely. The inside pure yellow, the outside very variable - from grey suffusion to dark purple stripes, each plant is different. S Turkey. Needs a dry summer rest.
15.00 EUR
 
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221
One of three new species of spring blooming crocuses found by me during my first Iranian trip and named after my wife Guna. In nature its corms are situated very deep in soil which at blooming time is extremely wet (over-flooded) but later becomes dry and hard.
20.00 EUR
 
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222
Very recently published species from large group of yellow crocuses with annulate corm tunics. Even picking up its corm - your fingers immediately will tell you - it is different because instead of usual hard tunics of all other so named "chrysanthus" crocuses it has thin, papery corm tunics. Flowers are bright yellow. Known from only one but large population near Kaan gec. where it is growing together with blue C. kangalensis.
15.00 EUR
Not available
223
This very special and beautiful crocus from Ikaria Island was named after great friend of me from Tasmania, Australia - Marcus Harvey. He was the person who sent me the first seeds of this crocus collected by him on this Greek Island. With the first blooming of it at me, it was clear that it is very different from C. nubigena as it was regarded before and needs proper name. Marcus up to his last year, when he lost the battle with cancer, every season visited Turkey, Balkans etc. collecting seeds for his nursery and always remembered about me, too. So I decided to name this species after him.
25.00 EUR
 
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224
This seedling from ‘Carpathian Wonder’ was raised by Estonian bulb lower Taavi Tuulik and was found as self-sown seedling in his garden on Hiumaa Island.
5.00 EUR
 
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225
The most unusual selfsawn seedling of 'Carpathian Wonder' found in his garden by Estonian teacher Taavi Tuulik on Hiumaa Island.
20.00 EUR
Not available
226
A close relative of C. reticulatus. Its species status recently was confirmed by DNA researches in Gatersleben Institute (Germany). Both are easy separable as C. hittiticus has black anthers. Flowers are lighter or darker lilac with more or less prominent dark stripes on the back of outer segments. Needs hot and dry summer and quite often blooming starts already in winter. This season already at very end of November, so may be must be reclassified as autumn blooming species?
8.00 EUR
 
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227
This excellent Iranian crocus named after British traveller John Ingham (he was the first who spotted it in the wild) was described only after printing of my monograph "The World of Crocuses" and so it is not included there. I'm still growing it only in pots although it come from quite high altitudes and could be growable in open garden, too. Very limited stock!
25.00 EUR
 
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228
Although Crocus ionopharynx was described as having black anthers it is not always the case. Sample HKEP-0304 (sent to me by Erich) has such a light grey tinge on the connectives that it is perceivable only after careful checking. Very important for identification is the purple colour deep in the throat, sometimes visible only in dissected flowers. The authors characterise the flowers as quite uniform in colour, any distinct striping and feathering on the outside observable only in a few specimens. In its typical (and best) forms with very dark outer basal blotches Crocus ionopharynx is very ornamental and with me it is a good grower in the greenhouse. It well sets seed and increases by splitting of the corms. According to I. Sözen, it does not like chalky soils and is tolerant of summer rains, but I keep it in greenhousre all the year round and grow in my standart mix..
30.00 EUR
 
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229
Provisionally I named this beauty from Iranian Kurdistans highlands as "Crocus iranicus" but most likely it belongs to new, yet not published species. Very limited stock.
40.00 EUR
Not available
230
Not so long ago under name isauricus were grown a lot of different species. Only quite recently Kerndorff and Pasche after careful comparing of herbariums, literature data found that true isauricus comes from some mountains around Taskent in S Turkey. I have two something different stocks from closely situated populations which well respond to data given by HKEP. The flowers of both samples have the cup-shape considered typical of the true plant. Parallely this problem was researched by Osman Erol, who regarded as typical "isauricus" plant published by Kerndorff and Pasche as C. concinnus, but it has much more slender flower segments, so I follow here HKEP's decision.
15.00 EUR
 
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231
A nice very late blooming “species” of hybrid origin with tiny white flowers. Its hybrid status was confirmed by genetic research. Although now very rarely offered, it is very beautiful and a good grower prolonging the season.
3.00 EUR
 
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232
Crocus kangalensis was published by Kerndorff & Pasche only few years ago, unfortunately the data about locality from where it was described is given very approximately. Bity, but most of new species published by both German researchers are characterized by observations of single population, so they not always characterizes all spectrum of variability. Plants offered here are collected near Kangal and are slightly different in some features from plants described by HKEP. The main difference is in colour of flower tube which in my stock is darker striped, but according HKEP must be light. Therefore, although I’m sure that mine stock belongs to the same species, I’m attaching “aff.” - what means - close to…
25.00 EUR
 
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233
The several years in cultivation have shown that C. katrancensis is easy in pots, if kept in the greenhouse the entire time, and it very well increases both from seed and by corm splitting. In flower colour it is very variable, but the darker coloured stripes or feathering are always located solely in the middle of the flower segments. I have not tried the species outside. In its habitat the summers are hot and dry.
20.00 EUR
 
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234
I maid many selections of this beautiful yellow-flowering crocus that bloom together with the melting snow and are ones of the earliest here. This stock contains open pollinated seedlings from plants originally collected at Agalik, near Samarkand in Uzbekistan. Contrary to more southern populations this one is extremely variable.
2.00 EUR
 
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235
This beautiful cultivar was selected from wild material in Czech Republic. Excellent grower and spectacular.
3.00 EUR
 
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236
Crocus kosaninii is easily distinguishable from other related species by its yellow throat and yellow filaments. Flowers are quite uniform, at least in the introduced stocks. Crocus kosaninii is free flowering and well sets seed. It grows freely outside and is quite hardy though during that most severe winter I almost completely lost my stock, survived only very few corms. Now the remainders grow in pots until the stock bulks up enough to be again partly planted outside. This species does not need a hot and dry storage during the summer months.
5.00 EUR
 
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237
C. leichtlinii is still rarely cultivated and can be found only in a few collections. In the wild it grows in a harsh environment with very cold winters and hot and dry summers, thus it is suitable only for pots under cover. But it very well sets seed and increases satisfactorily by corm splitting, so it is worthy of wider cultivation.
20.00 EUR
 
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238
Hybrid between crocus reticulatus and crocus angustifolius.From Nida.
5.00 EUR
 
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239
Another new species described by Kerndorff and Pasche some time ago but never before offered. Main feature separating it from others is white style and by my observations it didn't hybridise with other species, because its seedlings always are true to name. My stock is seed-raised from initial 2 corms which I got from Erich Pasche, Very limited stock.
35.00 EUR
 
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240
Another species that is practically identical with the crocus published by Kerndorff & Pasche as Crocus malatyensis. My stock was collected not very far away from type locality (closer to Malatya) and morphologically is very similar, only the anthers in my plants are occasionally with black connectives. Even genetically both stocks are very similar - is it sufficient to regard them as different? I do not know. At least flowers of both generally are inseparable and black colour in anthers occasionally appear in many Turkish species of this region.
20.00 EUR
 
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241
Flowers purest white with a rich yellow throat, large. The bright orange-yellow style branches provide a magnificent contrast to the white segments. An excellent form from the Velebit mountains, 520m, Croatia. Very easy.
3.00 EUR
Not available
242
One of the earliest spring crocuses, flowers on the outside with a very nice dark blue shade, inside whitish with a blue throat. Best kept in frame or alpine house, because needs a dry and hot summer. From the Kopet-Dag mountains in Turkmenistan.
20.00 EUR
 
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243
This species by flowers something resembles more widely known C. reticulatus. In pots it fares very well and even the forms collected in the neighbourhood of C. hittiticus never bloom in December or January, as is quite often the case with the latter. In the greenhouse it well sets seed and increases satisfactorily by corm splitting. I keep the pots during the summer in the greenhouse for the summers in its homeland are very dry and hot.
15.00 EUR
 
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244
It is one of the latest crocuses to bloom in the garden; with me in some seasons it bloomed even in mid-May. Flower colour is very variable from light lilac to very deep, even blackish purple.
8.00 EUR
 
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245
C. minutus something resembles C. danfordiae but is easy separable from last by its white stigma. If you can grow C. danfordiae you will have no problems with C. minutus, too. It excellently sets seed and increases by corm splitting. Maybe C. minutus is too small for an open bed, but it excellently grows in pots. The pots are kept only in the greenhouse and not brought outside after the end of vegetation.
15.00 EUR
 
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246
Crocus mouradii is correct name for plant earlier known as subsp. dissectus of C. flavus. So far I have tried it only in pots and most likely it needs a deeper planting than the majority of species, because in nature its corms lie very deep in the soil. In summer it requires dry conditions, so I keep the pots in the greenhouse all the year round.
10.00 EUR
 
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247
Most distinct and most beautiful between all species allied around so named C. chrysanthus (where were included genetically even unrelated species). Main feature separating it from all others is its long, black anthers. Only, very very few are offered, so price is so high.
50.00 EUR
Not available
248
Only recently officially published C. munzurense comes from rebelling Kurdistan, region now practically closed for foreigners. In cultivation it have proven to be extremely good grower and excellently increase by corm splitting and cormlets. The small sample from the type gathering, acquired in 2007, has now bulked up to four pots. It readily set seed, too. I keep the pots with C. munzurense in the greenhouse all the year round. This year I'm offering stock KPPZ-217, which slightly differs from original description, but is collected in same region.
20.00 EUR
 
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249
This makes large clusters of lilac suffused or striped white and fragrant flowers early in the season, Feb-Mar. These are usually, milk-white but can be lilac or rarely purplish. All of the forms from outside are attractively marked with darker violet veins towards the base. The throat is whitish.
15.00 EUR
 
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250
Crocus nubigena from the moment of its discovery and first description was a somewhat enigmatic plant. Although it was described from plants reported as collected at Mt. Gargarus, I didn’t find any herbaria collected wild. Regardless of quite poor available data, it was possible to conclude that plants growing wild near Bergamo and on Lesvos Island most precisely respond to original publication, and here are offered just stock originally collected on Lesvos Island with flowers lighter or darker blue and with very prominent black anthers with long basal lobes.
10.00 EUR
 
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251
Crocus olivieri occupies a huge area and is surprisingly uniform throughout, although in certain populations some variations are more common than in others. Masses of bright deep golden yellow flowers among wide spreading leaves, like a miniature C. flavus version. Collected on Chios Island, Greece where it is growing together with Crocus balansae. It very well sets seed without any additional pollination.
4.00 EUR
 
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252
The taxonomical status of this species still is something uncertain. Some botanists regard it as albino form of C. chrysanthus. From a gardener’s viewpoint C. pallidus is easy to grow both in the open garden and in the greenhouse. It perfectly sets seed (hand-pollination is required to ensure clean stocks!) and excellently increases by corm splitting. It is rather immune to heat spells so can either stay in the greenhouse or be brought outside.
10.00 EUR
 
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253
Large silvery soft violet-blue flowers with a small golden sometimes rimmed white throat and yellow anthers with a prominent 3-branched red-orange style. The exterior of the flowers is also slightly silvery. I still haven’t tried it outside but in pots it isn’t difficult. It is true species raised up from type gathering kindly shared with me by Erich Pasche, but stock still is very limited.
7.00 EUR
 
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254
Flowers white with a golden yellow throat. Blue forms are more often cultivated though are very rare in the wild and only recently rediscovered and renamed as C. yalovensis. White forms are rarely obtainable, although common in nature. Both are quite easy to grow in pots or in garden. Blooms very early in season.
4.00 EUR
 
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255
Flowers from striped to almost pure white with a narrow purplish tongue on the outer base of the flower segments. The filaments are very short and anthers distinctly black prior to the dehiscence (KPPZ-108). A distinct carnation-clove scent.
15.00 EUR
 
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256
Flowers rich bluish violet, somewhat darker at the base with a large deep yellow zone in the centre. Here I’m offering stock originally collected by Chris Brickell and Brian Mathew in prov. Bursa, Ulu-Dag, at altitude of 1800m in 1985. Flowers in this stock are rich bluish violet, somewhat darker at the base with a large deep yellow zone in the centre.
15.00 EUR
 
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257
The ground colour is pale violet flecked all over the outside with darker dots, contrasting well with the bright yellow anthers. Easy to grow and increases well by very small offset cormlets but rarely seen in cultivation although it is very decorative. From Isparta Province in S Turkey.
8.00 EUR
 
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258
Up to last Bulgarian spring blooming bluish crocus with annulate tunics was named as "C. adamii" what of course was not true, because Crocus adamii is growing only in Caucasus mountains. Quite recently this was confirmed when group of botanists described annulate crocus from adjacent Serbia as C. randjeloviciorum. Both populations - Serbian and Bulgarian are very close - actually on both sides of border and when I compared them - turned that they are of same species. I'm offering plants collected on Bulgarian side of border.
25.00 EUR
 
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259
It is another new-comer from Iran which I found during my first trip there and named after famous explorer of Iranian flora - Reinhard Fritsch, author of two marvellous books on Iranian and Central Asian Alliums. In cultivation Crocus reinhardii proved to be a good grower, although I have tried it only in pots. It well sets seed and increases by splitting. The species seems to be quite hardy and didn’t suffer in the winter when C. gunae (see) barely survived. In summer I keep the pots in the greenhouse.
25.00 EUR
 
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260
This beautiful tiny crocus from C. biflorus alliance was just recently described by me as a new species. Actually it was known for long but erroneously identified with C. biflorus, although this plant from Rhodos Island in Greece in most cases has grey or even black halves of anthers. There are other features separating both but about those you can read in International Rock Gardener # 64 - internet Journal of Scottish Rock Garden Club.
10.00 EUR
 
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261
One of the most beautiful spring blooming crocus with annulate corm tunics discovered parallely by Herndorff & Pasche team and by me and Turkish botanists, but published by HKEP a pair of months before us. Its flowers are very bright and it is perfectly growing in greenhouse, but I didn't tested it in outside garden. Known from few localities NE of Alanya, it is still practically unknown in collections.
40.00 EUR
 
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262
Crocus rujanensis in outer appearance looks something similar to C. dalmaticus and C. sublimis and differs from the two in a combination of characters rather than in one distinct feature. All my samples of it were collected at locus classicus on Rujan Planina, so they undoubtedly are correctly named. In my garden Crocus rujanensis is less vigorous than its closest relatives, most likely due to the lower altitudes where it occurs in wild; it seems that our winters are somewhat too harsh for it, but in a milder climate it is an excellent garden plant – well sets seed and is a good increaser by corm splitting.
5.00 EUR
 
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263
In cultivation it is not difficult, well sets seed and increases by corm splitting. During the 8 years the stock from the original 10 corms has bulked up to around 50 flowering-size corms and lots of smaller ones. Of course, it grows only in the greenhouse and every spring is carefully hand pollinated to get true seeds. Pots are kept in the greenhouse all year round.
17.00 EUR
 
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264
In all features, Crocus scepusiensis is very similar to the Crocus heuffelianus, only the style usually well overtops the anthers and the throat is hairy, the chromosome number is different as well. Now I think that it was mistake to regard it in my Crocus monograph as subsp. of Crocus heuffelianus, but both are very similar and requires same growing conditions.
5.00 EUR
Not available
265
Just recently named a new species. Flowers are medium to light blue with a more or less striped back of the outer tepals. Sometimes the stripes can be short, only at the base. The inner base deep yellow. From S end of the Tahtali mountain ridge in central Turkey.
20.00 EUR
 
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266
I was growing Crocus seisumsiana for many years, but only in spring 2017 I succeed to visit its wild populations at blooming time to make detailed and correct description of it according to so named “Kerndorff rules”, to avoid critics about incorrect data. It is named after my friend and very longtime travel partner in Central Asia and in Turkey. It is something similar to Crocus nubigena but is easily separable from it just by the colour of the anthers and tooth on basal rings.
15.00 EUR
 
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267
This Cretan, high mountainous species with very variable flowers, on the outside stippled and finely striped violet, inside purest white with a deep golden throat belongs to the nicest crocuses. It has the reputation of being tender and here I can grow it only under cover.
6.00 EUR
Not available
268
In flowers C. sieheanus is fairly similar to C. ancyrensis and C. chrysanthus although its orange style well exceeding the anthers give it a rather distinctive appearance. Of course, inspection of corm tunics allows to make a correct identification immediately. Crocus sieheanus is not difficult in cultivation but it needs a long, dry and hot summer rest, so its pots stay in the greenhouse all year round. In spring it requires abundant watering but the substrate must be well draining.
10.00 EUR
 
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269
It is wild hybrid found 11 km W of Seydishekir in Turkey and is natural cross between some of basically blue annulate species (concinnus ?) with some species from chrysanthus group (gembosii ??) with nice white flowers.
15.00 EUR
 
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270
This very special crocus was originally collected during KPPZ expedition to Turkey in 1990, when it was found growing on Karadag mountains, N of Karaman. Most likely it is a new, still unrecognised species, but this will need deeper checking. In any case it is very good grower and excellent addition to any collection.
20.00 EUR
 
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271
Jim Archibald collected this crocus together with Norman Stevens, but regarded it as special form of C. crewei. When he shared with me his crocuses, I immediately found that this sample has several features well separating it from typical C. crewei, although in wild they are not located very far one from another. I decided to name this one after my very long-time friend and travel partner Norman Stevens. It is quite variable by colour and on pictures are shown most differently looking plants from side and with open flowers.
30.00 EUR
 
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272
This is a spring-blooming crocus with black anthers from the C. biflorus complex growing in a very limited area in N Greece now mostly controlled by the militaries. Flowers are white or pale violet with prominent dark stripes on the sepal backs and a large and very dark yellow throat. Anthers variable - pure black or with a black connective, rarely yellow.
8.00 EUR
 
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273
A selection of this beautiful species from Mount Parnassus in Greece with lighter flowers where the lilac colouring on the segments outside is more speckled. The throat is paler tinted, somewhat greenish shaded. Crocus sublimis is one of the most vigorous Greek crocuses, and not only Greek. It survived and did not sustain any damage even in the extremely unfavourable winter of 2006/07, when most of outside growing crocuses were killed. It is also a good grower in pots and can stay in the greenhouse in summer months, too. Most individuals well multiply by corm splitting and readily set seed.
5.00 EUR
 
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274
Flowers delicate lilac with large yellow throat surrounded by a wide white band. It originally was found in Peloponnesus on Mt. Chelmos (Greece) and belongs to the most beautiful garden crocuses.
2.00 EUR
 
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275
This recently described species we were growing as sp. nova for several years before it was described as C. taseliensis by Helmut Kerndorff and Erich Pasche. Usually with striped segments back, but sometimes speckled. The ground colour is white, the throat is large, yellow, the anthers with a prominent black connective but can be plain yellow, too. This year I offer stock collected behind Moca gec. - more to the East from last year offered stock. They looks quite different and may be belongs to different species, but data from original description and lacking of exact locality from where comes type sample not allow to make some decision.
18.00 EUR
 
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276
The name of Crocus tauri is well known to crocus growers for many years already. A crocus from the “biflorus” group under this name is being offered by several nurseries. It seems that it is a sterile cultivated clone. From where just comes true C. tauri was unknown and HKEP used one of their acquisitions from Malatya province for designation of new epitype for this species. Unfortunately there are some discrepancies between published locality and notes on different herbarium sheets, labelled by HKEP as C. tauri. Both their localities are in around 30 km distance, my stock was collected just in middle between them and differs from description of C. tauri generally by connective of anthers, which in my plants occasionally are with thin black edges. In any case this is true species, having nothing common with usual commercial stocks. I don't know any other nursery offering true plant.
20.00 EUR
 
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277
Very distinctive from other species within the biflorus complex with erect silvery grey leaves and very long toothed rings of the corm tunic. Very different from subsp. adamii under which it is included in the marvellous monograph of Brian Mathew. Flowers large, violet blue striped or flushed on white ground, very variable. A true gem from Tschatir-Dag Yaila, Crimea. Another beauty gathered in last moment before Russia occupied Crimea.
10.00 EUR
 
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278
Previously known as Crocus herbertii. An excellent form from Mt. Uludag in NW Turkey with bright orange flowers and a stoloniferous habit. If planted and left undisturbed for a few years then every spring it will flower in abundance and slowly expand occupying the entire spot but will not become a weed, looking like yellow flames bursting from the bare earth. It makes a stunning show growing with me under old apple tree in a humus-rich soil, flowering every year without attention. Naturally very small corms, but they are flowering. Our team discovered another locality of this beautiful crocus not far from Izmir.
5.00 EUR
Not available
279
One of the most unusual species of crocuses growing wild on coastal rocks and meadows only slightly over sea-level where it gots ftrequent saltwater showers during strong storms. Known only from very few spots on Athos peninsula - monk state with very restricted access. Occasionally have blackish anthers. Very limited stock.
30.00 EUR
 
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280
This one crocus was described long ago but up to last regarded as synonim name for C. reticulatus. Really both are sufficiently different to be regarded as separate species. C. variegatus is distributed in Italy, Slovenia, Hungary and Bulgaria and has distinct yellow throat, whilst C. reticulatus comes from Caucasus and has much paler throat.
10.00 EUR
 
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281
I got seeds of this crocus from Marcus Harvey, but it was poor grower with me, but in same time it was so special that I from the first day regarded it as a new, still unpublished species. This insisted me to visit the place N of Drama in Greek Macedonia from where it was reported by Marcus. I found it at high altitudes growing in dense turf in extremely acid soil. I suppose that just the soil problems can explain my initial failures with this very special crocus. Now I'm growing it in Rhododendron mix improved with coarse sand and results immediately appeared. It likes cool and not too dry conditions. Does well here in a pot but as weather allows, I'm bringing pots outside into light shade. This will make its new roots before the old ones die away, so needs moist (not wet) compost at all times. Most likely it will be published as new species by Balkan botanists (or by myself?)...
25.00 EUR
Not available
282
C. vernus now is name officially applied for the crocus earlier known as C. albiflorus with small, mostly white flowers, but there are blue, bicolored and striped individuals between them, too. It has wide area but here is offered stock grown from seeds collected at Jura Alps, near La Dole, at c. 1400m altitude
10.00 EUR
 
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283
Flowers bright violet to lavender and white, always with distinct purple feathering on the exterior of the segments. A very vigorous and variable population from S France, dept. Var. Excellent grower, one of my favourites.
3.00 EUR
 
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284
Broad-petalled, vivid yellow flowers each of which has a distinct orange zone in the throat around yellow anthers and a divided orange style. The flowers are marked lightly with bronze feathering outside. Crocus vitellinus is very similar to C. graveolens but is reported as very sweetly scented. The shape of the flowers can easily distinguish both species: C. vitellinus flowers are slender, funnel-shaped with no distinct waist and the segments are wider and usually rounded at the tips, unlike the narrow and pointed segments in C. graveolens. C. vitellinus usually has less numerous leaves which are wider. Easy and vigorous in the Western Europe gardens, but here growable only in pots.
5.00 EUR
 
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285
Flowers very nice something variable in colour - from purest white to white shaded lilac or light purplish on segments outside. Although slightly smaller than in other forms, flowers very abundantly. From near Jurjevo in Croatia.
5.00 EUR
 
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286
My stock of this crocus was luckely saved from caterpillar tracks. Our team was on its place on Sunday, when road building jobs stopped and still left small gully not covered by basement of new highway. On sides of it we spotted this nice crocus, at that time still without name. Later it was rediscovered a little higher by slope and named by Turkish botanist Osman Erol as C. yakarianus. It is nice, very pale blue to practically white blooming species. Very limited stock.
25.00 EUR
 
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287
This small light blue blooming quite recently described as subspecies crocus, but rised to species range by me has nice light blue flowers and is distributed in Čan province in NW Turkey where it is growing on vernally very wet meadows, so is suitable for outdoor growing here, too. Prefair something more acid soil than most of crocuses. At first I named it as C. violaceus, but then turned that such name already was used and so this crocus need new name. I decided to name it C. yalovensis after province where it is growing wild.
5.00 EUR
 
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288
C. zetterlundii is very easy in cultivation and readily sets seed. Although I have not tried it in the open garden, judging by the conditions in its homeland, it might be a good grower, just like its distant neighbour C. abantensis, which even prefers and grows better in the garden than in greenhouse pots. It increases well by splitting but if you want to multiply C. zetterlundii from seed, isolation and controlled hand-pollination is essential, as it can hybridise with other species from the C. biflorus aggregate.
20.00 EUR
 
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289
American bulb offered by me for the first time. It was grown up from seeds collected on Peninsular Ranges, San Diego Co., California where it was growing at altitude around 1000 m. Usually it is forming several bright blue-violet, tubular bells with flaring lobes in large crowded umbels on 30-40 cm long stems. All members of this genus are easily grown in the garden. They are nice alternatives for the taller growing alliums. Needs good drainage as in wild it is growing on dry gravelly slopes.
5.00 EUR
 
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290
This is so named "snake lily" - its flowering stems coils and twines up through shrubs and can reach even 1 m height to carry the pinkish rose perianths composed into up to 10 cm large heads into the sunlight. So I'm usually putting a stick into pot for supporting its stems, otherwise they can grow to sides, looking for some stem of Triteleia or other longer growing bulb for climbing up. Although hardy it needs dry summer dormancy, in my polytunnel it grows perfectly and always enjoys all visitors. It really is unique plant.
10.00 EUR
 
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291
The inflorescence of this one of the most striking of the central Asian Aroids is a superb deep violet-black, velvet-textured spathe surrounding a thickened, rounded spadix redolent with the smell of warm dung. I was growing it for years in outside garden on something sloped beds and always noted its blooming walking around and suddenly touched by its smell, forcing to think about some died animal inside my garden - and then came understanding - the Eminiums are blooming. It enjoys a hot, well-drained spot outside in a deep and fertile, loam-based soil but is well growing in deep pots as well. There are two species growing in Central Asia, both easy separable by shape of leaves.
25.00 EUR
 
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0
The genus Fessia was separated from Scilla by Spetha, who split scillas into many new/old genera. Not all of those "new" genera was accepted, but Fessia is one of those which was acknowledged by most of botanists and in Kew. The species of Fessia are distributed wild from Iran (inclusive Aserbaijan Talish) up to Pakistan and into former soviet Central Asian states - Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. More about Fessias you can read into International Rock Gardener (online journal of Scottish Rock Garden Club) following link http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2019May311559296345IRG113.pdf On the picture Fessia gorganica (not offered this year).
0.00 EUR
 
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292
Earlier included under Scilla but now it was separated in own genus Fessia. Easy separable from all other Fessia species because produce leaves already in autumn, but they didn't suffer from winter frosts. It flowers early, making up to 24 cm long spikes of hanging, reflexed bright blue bells. Native to Iran where it is growing in lightly shaded woodland areas that are home of so many good garden plants. Light shade is the best with a dry summer rest.
7.00 EUR
 
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293
When I was student they were named Ficari, then at some time suddenly I read that now must be used Ranunculus. I never was satisfied with this change, but now again they are returned back to Ficaria. Some botanists their life are dedicating splitting some genus, then comes another, all the best years of life using for lumping them back. But this is case when I completely agree with last changes in their taxonomy. Some regards them as weeds, but this variety found near Plymouth by R.Hoskins in 1991, certainly isn’t such. It is slowest increaser between all celandine's grown in my collection. A large plant with large cream flowers and brown reverses. Slight silver markings on the leaves. We plant them in slightly shaded spots in the grass where it makes excellent colour display in the spring.
5.00 EUR
 
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294
Unusually shaped flowers - fully double centres with an outer ring of petals. The flowers are tucked tight into the marbled foliage in spring and are bright golden-yellow. The centres are tightly packed with petals with an outer 'cog' of single petals. It is very eye-catching. A robust, long-lived and easily grown plant given a moist soil. Like all the garden Celandines it appears early in the year showing its marbled leaves. The buds can appear early too but remain tight until spring arrives. After flowering the plant retreats underground and rests until late winter.
3.00 EUR
 
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295
This beautiful form was selected by Taavi Tuulik on Hiiumaa island in Estonia. At the very start they look like “buttons” but later develop long petals. Flowers very abundantly and is a good addition to the already known varieties.
3.00 EUR
 
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296
This very unusual species was collected at very foggy morning on Tendurek gec. in NE Turkey just at border with Iran. It looks very strange - something resembles hybrid between armena, michailowsky and may be kurdica. Several years later I revisited locality and found that only such frits are growing there, allowing suppose that may be it is a new different, still unpublished species.
25.00 EUR
 
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297
This subspecies appears fairly distinct from more widely grown subsp. kurdica. Its main distinction is in rounded flowers, apart from distinct foliage. Flowers are green, chequered dark greenish-brown and with brown edges of segments. From high mountains in W of Iran.
8.00 EUR
 
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298
This form of F. gibbosa was originally collected in Turkmenistan part of Kopet-Dag, not far from Aschkabad. Those mountains now are difficult to access and this stock was very carefully kept in my collection for almost 40 years, but only with building up of greenhouse it was possible to multiply it.
25.00 EUR
Not available
299
There are two fritillaries that bear the name “grandiflora”. Russian botanists apply this name to a frit with very large, even gigantic dark brown and green chequered flowers very different from what is grown as subsp. grandiflora of F. kotschyana. I'm offering the plant according opinion of Russian botanists, which I suppose as correctly named. Found wild in Talish of Azerbaijan State, not in Iran. An excellent grower, good increaser and one of the most spectacular in my collection.
15.00 EUR
 
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300
This form from NE Ukraine I received under the name of F. ruthenica. This is a much smaller plant, not longer than 40 cm. Flowers smaller, up to 3 per stem, dark brown, though variable. The end of the name 'oides' means „looking like”, although it differs very much from F. meleagris.
15.00 EUR
 
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301
Nice miniature fritillary which rarely exceeds 10 cm in height with up to two very bright yellow bell shaped proportional flowers. Plant from high altitudes and is hardy here, needs well drained humus rich soil. E Turkey. 12,-
10.00 EUR
Not available
302
A superb and little known Iranian species. In colour the flowers are similar to F. michailovskyi but they are arranged on a much taller stem and the flowers are more rounded, parallel-sided and they do not recurve at the mouth; it is more floriferous than the typical michailovskyi. In addition reuteri has wider, curled, basal leaves. From the Zagros Mountains in Iran.
5.00 EUR
Not available
303
Native to the western Himalayas and Asia Minor Fritillaria uva-vulpis has dusty purple to dark mahogany, bell shaped flowers with yellow tips of flower segments in mid, but more to late spring. Excellent for pots, where grows up to 30 cm tall. In garden needs full sun to half shade and well drained but vernally wet soil where it can grow for years increasing in numbers.
5.00 EUR
 
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304
The most beautiful form of G. charlesii I have ever seen, so different that it is worth a varietal name. Foliage slightly divided but with very prominent deep reddish purple markings - spots and lines. Flowers pinkish purple.
8.00 EUR
 
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305
A close relative of G. charlesii but growing wild in Iran and with much more attractive leaves. Just the leaves are the main feature adding a special beauty to tuberous geraniums. Free-flowering nature and the compact habit result in that the whole plant is completely covered in gorgeous pink-purple blossoms.
10.00 EUR
 
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307
Beautifull tuberous species from Berberidaceae family, blooming early in spring. It make simply divided, glabrous very healthy, slightly blue-green foliage. The leaves, slightly red-tinted upon emergence appear soon after the flowers. They are a very bright, and vivid yellow, in a colour and shape familiar to all who know the flowers of Berberis in the garden. It is a very hardy plant. Both the leaf growth and flowers can take ice and snow without damage. Sometimes in my garden increases by self-sawing.
10.00 EUR
Not available
308
Another nice Gymnospermium, quite easy growing (sometimes self-seeding) although not as spectacular for the stem is quite pale dark brown. Flowers deep yellow with greyish brown shading on the outside base of the sepals. This stock comes from Kara-Tag mountains in Central Asia and differs from plants growing in Varzob valley, Tadjikistan, recently published as G. vitellinum.
10.00 EUR
 
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309
This species was published quite recently for plant which I was earlier growing as G. darwasicum Varsob form but it was really different from Kara-Tag plants. So I was not very surprised when it got own, new name. Easy growable both in pots and in garden where requires only good drainage, but tolerant to light conditions because in wild it is growing only inside shrubs and below trees.
10.00 EUR
Not available
310
This ancestor of garden hyacinths has something variable in shade lighter or darker blue flowers in loose spike and has the same fantastical very sweet scent so typical for all hyacinths.Its name chionophilus means "snow-loving" and it grows at higher altitudes than related H. orientalis. Easy in a sunny spot in a well-drained but fertile soil and this makes a beautiful display, scenting the air around on a warm early-spring day, it will do the same in alpine house where it will open early in the season.
10.00 EUR
 
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0
Reticulate irises - A - (sometimes regarded as different genus Iridodyctium) in most cases are not very difficult in garden but you must provide excellent drainage as they don't like (with few exceptions) moisture after end of blooming and in summer. Excellently growth in pots and many are used for forcing, too. Another group of bulbous irises known under common name Juno-irises (regarded as separate genus Juno by some botanists) has thick additional roots at base of bulb. You must be careful during repotting (replanting in garden) and bulb cleaning for not to break them off. It will seriously weaken plant in next season or it can even die, although sometimes those roots can be used for propogation, too. Many are more tolerant to garden conditions, although some are very difficult even in pots. All (with very few exceptions) prefair dry conditions during summer. Review about species of reticulata irises you can find in online magazine of Scottish Rock Garden Club - International Rock Gardener - following link http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2019Apr261556270768IRG_112_April_2019.pdf
0.00 EUR
Not available
311
One of very excellent discoveries in Iran where several still unpublished reticulata irises are growing wild. I collected it during my first trip to Iran. This beautiful and well growing species up to recently was offered as light (even as white) form of I. zagrica, which growth in Iran but very far to south from Iris avromanica. It was named after Kuh-e Shāhu (Hawraman) Ridge, where it was observed. Common with I. zagrica is breaking of flower from stalk at end of blooming leaving long "beak" on top of seedpod. Flowers are very light bluish shaded, good grower and increaser but stock still is very limited.
20.00 EUR
 
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312
This beautiful reticulata Iris with flowers in nice sky blue shade was collected in Iran between Gur Sefid and Firuzkuh at 2140 m altitude during my first trip to Iran.
10.00 EUR
 
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313
One of the most beautiful but still rare in cultivation Reticulata irises with large light and dark purple and blue flowers and crocus-like leaves. Blotch on the fall bright yellow. Very beautiful, well growing and increasing here on open, south faced field but more safe if grown in pots as need hot and dry summer rest. From neighbourhood of Alma-Ata, Kazakhstan.
20.00 EUR
Not available
314
Another new-comer from recently published new series Zagricae from Iran. Common for them all are breaking of flower at end of blooming just below it, leaving with seedpod long beak. This species is growing at high altitudes on pass between Saqqez and Marivan in Iranian Kurdistan on vernally extremely wet places along streams from melting snow. Soil at blooming time and shortly after is very wet, even damp. Flowers are deep purple, very impressive. Good grower and increaser here, but stock still is very limited.
25.00 EUR
 
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315
Those plants were collected wild in Georgia and has typical purple main colour and large flowers which characterizes form bringing name "caucasica".
5.00 EUR
 
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316
Another deep purple acquisition from Pulumar Valley in East Turkey, collected by joint expedition of Arnis Seisums, Jim Archibald and Norman Stevens. Comparing with JRRK-069 it has wider, rounded falls and in general is something lighter purple.
7.00 EUR
 
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317
This almost bicoloured form was collected at 2000 m altitude in the Zagros mouintains in W Iran. Its flowers are dark blue with almost black falls. Iranian reticulata irises are full of surprises and I think that from there several new, different species will be described, when someone will start deeper research on them.
10.00 EUR
 
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318
It is the first time when true Iris zagrica is offered at all, at least I don't know any other offer of true species. Unfortunately its publication in Iris group bulletin of RHS and in Curtis' Botanical Magazine was accompanied with a lot of mistakes in illustrative material, so it was unclear - what is true Iris zagrica. For a long time I regarded this one as new species, and only finding it in wild by myself, comparing with plants from Iranian and Iraq Kurdistans later published as irises marivanica, avromanica and zetterlundii, careful checking of pictures and literature, correspondence with other travellers allowed to decipher this enigma. True Iris zagrica is tiny plant growing wild in Lorestan on dry slopes. Not the most easy, but its beauty of contrast between white or even creamy flower parts with almost blackish falls, is worth of applied efforts. Only very few offered!
40.00 EUR
 
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319
This beautiful relative to Iris zagrica (belongs to same series) was discovered by Henrik Zetterlund in Iraq. It has very dark shaded midrib of standards and some other features separating it from Iris marivanica (which is purple) and I. avromanica (very light blue). At end of blooming old flower easy breaks off just at base of flower segments, leaving long "beak" at top of the seedpod. Good grower in greenhouse and well set seeds after hand-pollination. Slightly variable in colour, so two pictures of opposite variants attached.
40.00 EUR
Not available
320
I offer true species collected in locus classicus. Flowers are light blue with white blotch but quite variable on 10 to 25 cm long stem. Under this name I. graeberiana, vicaria, willmottiana and others sometimes are offered. Careful searching in old papers done by my friend, great specialist in Juno irises Arnis Seisums, allowed to find from where in Uzbekistan it comes and to find true Iris albomarginata. Extremely rare and only very few available.
15.00 EUR
 
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321
Very vigorous tall growing Juno iris with pure yellow to bicoloured yellow-white flowers growing wild in Tadjikistan where each population can be something different.
4.00 EUR
 
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322
It is another case when true juno iris species was introduced in cultivation by me and Arnis Seisums. It has nothing common with so named "Iris graeberiana of cultivation" which really are different hybrids. We found this juno when searched for Iris winkleri at heights of Kugart and at first identified it as Iris zenaidae and under this name distributed it for several years before Arnis and Tony Hall from Kew found that I. zenaidae really is identical with true I. graeberiana and so priority belongs to name graeberiana. It is one of the brightest and most spectacular juno irises growable both - in open garden (may be even better) and under cover.
12.00 EUR
 
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323
This stock represents some extreme in variation of I. orchioides s.l. being dwarf, only 12-15 cm tall with 1-3 large creamy white or creamy, yellow crested flowers, with a hairy ridge in the throat. One of the showiest juno irises, certainly worth of an FCC award. Keeps its dwarf habitus in culture. Storage roots thin. Collected in the Ugam mnt. range, Uzbekistan. In oppose to Arnis Seisums and Tony Hall I still think that it is different, new species worth of own name.
10.00 EUR
 
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324
This form comes from Sina a in the Chulbair Mountains of Uzbekistan and is one of the most beautiful between all vicaria's grown by me, As any wild form it is something variable in colour but belongs to the darkest blue shaded forms of this easy growable species. Can be grown in outside garden, too where can stay for several years without replanting if good drainage is provided.
10.00 EUR
 
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325
Another very beautiful clone of this species. Flowers are bright sky blue with a deep violet blade and bright orange crest. Its special beauty lies not only in the harmony of the colour pattern but also in the fairly dwarf overall appearance. This form comes from the Kugi-Tang mountain range in SW Uzbekistan.
15.00 EUR
 
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326
Muscari in general are much overlooked plants but among them are incredible beauties. Among the best is one of the rarest in the wild species, discovered not long ago and known only by a few plants in three small localities. Although in the wild it grows in very special conditions on glistening white ground composed of marble or limestone chips, in culture it turned out to be a very good grower in a standard pot mix, too. I’m offering third-generation plants from few seedlings grown up by me from 5 wild collected seeds at its locus classicus. They have very dense and “fat” spikes of a very deep blue colour.
6.00 EUR
 
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327
A very nice species described only in 1994 with tiny flowers attached with short pedicels to a reddish tinted flower stalk. Fertile flowers almost black with a slight purplish shade and large recurved white lobes distinctly constricted at the mouth. Fertile flowers very light blue, making excellent contrast. From W of Konya, Turkey.
5.00 EUR
 
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328
One of the lightest blue forms of this species marked with liters "ex-ex" what means - super beautiful.
5.00 EUR
 
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329
There are not many plants so widely distributed and so variable as it is in M. armeniacum known under different various names. This one was originally collected in Turkey few km NE from Yagmurlu, at alt. 600 m and can be characterised by late blooming (the last of all "armeniacum" samples) and very narrow leaves.
5.00 EUR
 
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330
Muscari azureum is a lovely, compact china-blue grape hyacinth with bell shaped flowers which are not constricted at mouth. As typical to this genus flowers has pleasant scent. Excellent for garden and pots. From Sakaltutan gec. in Turkey where it was growing on vernally very wet meadow.
7.00 EUR
 
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331
Very spectacular and practically unknown in cultivation muscari species from Adigeya district in Northern Caucasus (Russia) only quite recently collected there by Henrik Zetterlund. Flowers are variable - lighter and darker blue, sometimes greenish, but in any case excellent addition to any collection, and, I suppose, good showwinner.
8.00 EUR
 
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332
Bulb sheets are yellow, comparatively with plants size it is forming very large bulbs. Jim Archibald regarded this stock from Ziyaretpesi gec. (alt. 2100 m) where it is growing on exposed, limestone-gravel ridges, as a new species only resembling typical discolor. It is very possible under 5this name hides several species.
6.00 EUR
 
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333
Growing wild in Iran, Iraquish Kurdistan and Syria (entering adjacent Turkey) it is one of the most dramatically coloured muscari species with distinctly very dark, even blackish violet flowers. Comes from low altitudes and I didn't try it outside, as it needs good summer rest. Very limited stock!
7.00 EUR
 
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334
This tiny Muscari with very bright blue flowers resembles Muscari armeniacum, but it is much more delicate, with distinctly smaller flower spikes densely covered with small flowers. It was collected near melting snow on Tahtali Daģ in Turkey. It still is not published, but the name seem will remain without changes.
10.00 EUR
 
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335
This species is close to M. armeniacum but its leaves mostly develop only in spring and it is growing on wetter places, in sandy soils near water streams usually over-flooded in spring. In this stock flowers are something lilac shaded blue composed in wide spikes.
4.00 EUR
 
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336
Undoubtedly the best white muscari I have ever seen. It forms incredibly large and dense spikes of the purest milky white. My option for its name was ‘Milky Way’ but as this name is being used for the famous brown chocolate, I changed it to ‘Snow Queen’.
4.00 EUR
 
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337
This Iranian beauty was collected by Arnis Seisums during famous Swedish-Latvian-Iranian-Zagros-Expedition. It has pale sky blue, widely open at mouth flowers in very compact dwarf spikes. Excellent show flower for exhibition in pots.
5.00 EUR
 
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338
This beautiful muscari was collected by Arnis Seisums and Gerben Tjerdsmaa over vil. Altiparmak in Kackar mountains where it was blooming at snow-line at altitude something below 3000 m. Arnis regard it as new, still unpublished species. It is slightly variable - collected were 3 samples, and occasionally it starts blooming already in December.
10.00 EUR
 
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339
A beautiful representative of Leopoldia with long spikes with slightly lilac-tinted, even pinkish blue sterile flowers and deep blue fertile flowers on short pedicels along the stem. From N of Refahye in Turkey.
5.00 EUR
 
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340
One of the most pretty ornithogalum species not only in Iran. It is medium sized with dense spike of large flowers. In wild I found it in Olang gorge, where few plants were collected already in 2008. Now stock increased and I can offer it for the first time. Actually I didn't found anyone else offering this beauty.
20.00 EUR
 
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341
This unique ornithogalum was for the first time offered only few years ago for significantly higher price, but everyone customer got instead of one ordered plant two plants. This species is completely selfsterile, so due very good bulb crop I doubled number of bulbs for each order to ensure further propagation by seeds. So this year I again reduced price. It still is not published and so name could be changed later, but it is very unique between other ornithogalums and according its discoverer Arnis Seisums most likely belongs even to new series.
15.00 EUR
 
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342
Flowers deep pink, only the petal base white, the throat greenish shaded. This is a somewhat smaller form but its greatest advantage is the purple coloured base of leaves, giving each glaucous green rosette a “purple heart”!
5.00 EUR
 
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343
Beautifull self-sawn seedling of Oxalis adenophylla which turned good grower and increaser.
10.00 EUR
 
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344
Beautiful seedling of unknown origin, collected as self-sawn "weed" in wrong pot with different bulbs. Good grower and increaser.
10.00 EUR
Not available
345
A beautiful hybrid raised by Janis great friend the famous British bulb grower Kath Dryden with purple-tinted flowers covered by deep purple nervation, which suffuses in the direction to the throat and then abruptly ends at the large greenish white throat.
5.00 EUR
Not available
346
Recently named variety with light soft pink flowers with brownish nervation, more prominent in the small, greenish yellow throat but disappearing at the edge. Blooms very abundantly. Large and fat rhizomes.
7.00 EUR
Not available
347
An excellent selection with very large flowers, the white ground colour of petals so densely covered with a deep blue enervation that flowers seem darker blue. Leaves are very beautifully undulated but this cv. flowers so abundantly and with such large flowers that at flowering time the leaves are hidden below the wide petals.
5.00 EUR
Not available
348
Flowers very variable in colour in different bluish, pinkish and purplish shades. Leaves with narrow lobes, mostly with very beautifully curved and wavy edges, but very variable in shape and colour, too. Very different from all other Oxalis grown by me and completely hardy outside where it blooms every year.
7.00 EUR
Not available
349
Better known as Scilla autumnalis but now separated into the genus Prospero. It is very variable in the wild. Not all forms are good growers. The Crimean plants belong to the best and earliest to bloom with medium-sized dense racemes with pinkish blue flowers.
5.00 EUR
 
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350
About discovering of this unusual autumn blooming scilla you can read amazingt story in my book BURRIED TREASURES. Actually found by Arnis Seisums, all bulbs were forwarded to Janis as supoposed to be ordinar P. autumnalis. Only in cultivation was found that it differs from traditional species by pink flowers and forming of leaves only in spring whilst other species are going in winter with green leaves and therefor is lass hardy than new Prospero (Scilla) seisumsiana.
15.00 EUR
 
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351
Very special puschkinia found very far to East from locus classicus of P. peshmenii. By inflorescence and flowers it resembles P. peshmenii only its flowers are white. Is it peshmanii or some another still unpublished species? To solve this problem additional researches are needed.
20.00 EUR
 
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352
A gorgeous almost pure white new species of Puschkinia, earlier regarded as colour variation of P. peshmenii. P. kurdistanica has at base greenish blue toned flowers with tiny trace of blue-green on the midribs of the buds. Later flowers become more bluish toned. It is vigorous in growth, forming 20cm tall spikes, having long pedicels, at specially at bottom flowers and is even more floriferous than P. peshmenii. Our team found this beauty during BATMAN expedition near Tatvan-Van road. Typical P. peshmenii with greenish coloured flowers (so named Rix form) was found in Hakkari province in very East Turkey, near Iranian border. More about this discovery you can read in online magazine International Rock Garden, 2019, August issue (#116) edited by Scottish Rock Garden Club.
15.00 EUR
 
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353
This one is the lightest colored and with something more campanullate flowers than in other stocks. Flowers are almost white, only slightly shaded blue. From Alaverdi in Armenia.
3.00 EUR
 
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354
A wild collected stock of this well-known plant, slender, with bigger flowers and a far better arrangement of the raceme than in usually cultivated stocks, resembling a hyacinth, and of the darkest blue colour. From Mnt. Aragats, Armenia.
5.00 EUR
 
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355
A very elegant species with bright violet-blue flowers with a deep blue midrib and a small white centre nicely positioned on a purplish tinted stalk. Outer tepals are slightly rolled back. Easy in both - pots and the garden.
6.00 EUR
 
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356
This nice Scilla has only one (occasionally two) bright violet-blue flowers per scape, but the larger number of scapes which can be up to 10 from a well-established bulb well compensates for the smaller number of flowers on each scape, making it very floriferous..
5.00 EUR
 
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357
Strongly looking this form must to be named as Hyacinthoides italica because at base of pedicels there are 2 minor bracts (in Scilla must be only 1 or none), but superficially it looks so similar to Scilla bifolia not only by flowers but by bulbs too that I prefer to keep it under Scilla’s. Up to 20 large waxy brightest milky white flowers in elegant, large raceme.
5.00 EUR
 
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358
This species has very wide distribution and many named variants. Not all populations are equally successful in gardens. I have never succeeded with plants from W. Carpathian mountains (now named as Scilla kladnii), but offered stock is excellent grower originating from Chios Island with nice pure deep blue flowers in large spikes.
2.00 EUR
 
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359
This beautiful scilla was discovered by Norman Stevens in Turkey. It is very similar to S. bifolia but by Norman it was collected far from known S. bifolia localities. Flowers deep blue with at least 12 petals and sometimes even with few anthers and stigma but Janis never get seeds of it. No other similar Scilla exist.
6.00 EUR
 
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360
This is some 15-20 cm tall species with two to four leaves at ground level and a densely packed spike of horizontal, only slightly pendant starry flowers in bright mid blue. Each bloom is some 1 cm across and is held on a short pedicel just clear of the stem. A native of light woodlands, this is happy in similar conditions of light shade and a humus rich soil and it is reputed to naturalise in time. Easily grown but not a common plant and very rarely offered.
5.00 EUR
 
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361
Numerous, up to 9, big, deep violet flowers on 15 cm stems. Its leaves are purple suffused and almost adpressed to the ground at flowering time, what gives the plant a charming appearance. One of my favourite scillas which mosty likely needs its own species name.
12.00 EUR
 
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362
This is a very nice and distinct scilla with violet-blue flowers composed in an erect raceme. Flower segments are somewhat narrow but nicely reflexed. It was collected by BATM team in Turkey at 1200 m in cracks of rocks and under shrubs where it grew in peaty clay soil together with Hyacinthus orientalis.
5.00 EUR
 
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363
A close relative of Scilla bifolia included by some botanists into this complex; it is very small but very abundantly and early blooming with nice bright blue flowers from near Izmir in Turkey.
3.00 EUR
 
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364
An excellent form of this beautiful sp. reported as collected in Taurus mnt. range, S Turkey and received from our Czech friend Vaclav Joðt under name S. ingridae. It has numerous very long racemes with up to 10 flowers on each spike. In any case very different from the wild S. ingridae. One of the best.
7.00 EUR
 
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365
This beauty is somewhat similar to S. armena as it makes several spikes from each bulb bearing only 1, rarely up to 3 flowers at the top but flowers are light sky blue with a darker midrib. Collected some 50 km from Tunceli on Munzur ridge, in Kurdish district partly closed to foreign visitors. Now it is one of the rarest scillas, supposed to extinct in wild due of farming, but recently Turkish botanists found small population with around 200 individuals - supposed to be the last in the wild..
10.00 EUR
 
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366
Scilla libanotica is species of the S. siberica alliance, but distinct in having up to 2.5 cm large sky-blue flowers something resembling S. mischtschenkoana. It is small plant, around 10 cm tall at blooming time, with up to 4, sideways-facing flowers of sky-blue with narrow segments faintly lined deeper and contrasting with intense violet anthers. My stock originally was collected in Lebanon, east of Beirut in shady rock crevices.
5.00 EUR
 
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367
Each scape has up to five flowers of lovely, clear sky-blue colour and often is formed 3 scapes from bulb.
5.00 EUR
 
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368
Recently described species from S. sibirica group with very light blue, slightly violet-shaded flowers on very short pedicels, distinct from others. In colour can compete only with S. winogradowii.
5.00 EUR
 
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369
One of the earliest scillas flowering in the garden together with the earliest crocuses. Flowers are bluish white with a darker midrib.
3.00 EUR
 
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439
See Zagrosia persica - item #424
3.00 EUR
 
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370
Flowers very beautiful vivid blue with white centre. The perianth segments are sharply reflexed like in erythroniums. I grow it in full sun, in peaty soil, never allowing it to dry out. From Chra-Ckaro pass, Georgia.
4.00 EUR
Not available
371
Scilla rosenii in itself is a plant of exceptional beauty, but its albino form has no competition, with the purest white flowers of perfect form and yellow anthers, only some albino forms of S. gorganica with their blue anthers might be superior. Selected by me in a large wild population in Georgia.
25.00 EUR
 
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372
This scilla belongs to our real favourites producing several long erect spikes with many densely spaced very light sky blue flowers.
10.00 EUR
 
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373
Miniature sternbergia species from Crete. Some botanists regard it as identical with S. sicula and lutea, but seeing both in wild and growing side by side (gigantic sicula and lutea with miniature greuteriana), anyone will agree that both are very different species. Our stock comes from near Lasiti Plain on Crete. It start blooming without leaves and leaf development follow during blooming. On the last attached picture in front is S. greuteriana and in background S. sicula.
10.00 EUR
 
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374
This is one of the largest of autumn sternbergias with golden yellow goblet-shaped flowers from September onwards among wide deep green leaves. At present SS. lutea, sicula and greuteriana are regarded by botanists as one species, but they are so distinct that from a gardeners’ point of view it is better to keep them separated.
5.00 EUR
 
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375
Large buttercup yellow flowers early in autumn with narrow deep green leaves. I grow it in an unheated polytunnel because outside during our winters leaves usually suffer serious damage from cold. From Greece.
4.00 EUR
 
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377
A beautiful snow-melt species from Chile grown up by me from Jim Archibald's seeds with quite widely opened, conical white blooms on short stems. Need humus-rich soil, full sun and it is water tolerant.
10.00 EUR
 
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378
A combination of distinctive characteristics produces an elegant triteleia. The exquisite shades of rose-pink to red-violet are rarely represented in other triteleias. There is a definite demarcation between the spreading lobes and the funnel-shaped tube. The pale, crown-like ring of exserted, blue-anthered stamens accentuates this. The paler inner surface of the throat glistens from the fine, glass-like hairs on its surface. The flowers, numbering between 14-30, are displayed in up to 15 cm large umbels on long scapes.
10.00 EUR
 
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379
The straw-yellow flowers with a dark purple midstripe and powder blue anthers are very attractive. They are more broadly funnel-shaped than T. laxa with the perianth lobes only slightly spreading. There are up to 20, 2.5 cm large flowers on up to 30 cm long scapes. Although in wild it grows in partly shaded spots, here it tolerates full sum. Very rarely offered, beautiful plant for garden and as cut flower.
10.00 EUR
 
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380
Common name of this wonderful Triteleia is “Fool’s Onion”. It makes dense globes of glistening white, bowl-shaped perianths with wide overlapping tepals forming up to 25 flowers in large, up to 7-8 cm in diameter flower heads on 20-30 cm long stems. Wonderfully fragrant, and a good cut flower. Like other Triteleias, hyacinthina is particularly well suited to partial shade, doing especially well under trees, in early spring needs much water, but later prefer dry conditions, usually provided by tree roots..
5.00 EUR
 
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381
A beautiful species with mostly deep violet, funnel-shaped flowers with spreading lobes and violet-purple tips of the tepals, are the largest in the genus. It makes up to 30 flowers composed in 10 cm spheres on up to 40 cm long scapes. Seedlings varies greatly in shade and sometimes are quite light (see picture #3) A showy garden plant for a sunny border and for cutting. Should be planted 8 cm deep and 5-8 cm apart in better-drained soils in good light in the garden or in pots.
4.00 EUR
 
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382
This species is very rarely offered. It has large, elongated bright flowers somewhat resembling T. kaufmanniana however the flowers do not open so widely as in T. kaufmanniana and they have a different colour – yellow with a red back of outer segments. It has erect habit, folded carinate leaves with pronounced midribs seeds are different, too. Known only from Sary Chilek National Park, in the Chatkal Mountain range. Despite its rarity in the wild, this is a very good grower here and it flowers freely in sunshine, making 30cm tall stems.
20.00 EUR
 
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383
A nice shorttulip with big-sized crimson-red flowers, at the centre blotched black. Leaves nicely undulate. I Charming and not difficult. My stock originally was collected in NE Turkey.
10.00 EUR
Not available
384
A charming dwarf tulip with star-shaped deep rose-pink flowers with a purplish basal blotch diffusely edged white. Always in great demand!
5.00 EUR
 
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385
I discovered this beautiful short tulip with large widely open star-like white flowers and a large deep yellow centre during my first trip to Central Asia but never had the courage to describe it as a new species. Recent cytological researches have confirmed that I was right – it really is a new tulip species.
4.00 EUR
Not available
386
Tulipa biflora represents a very confusing group of small-flowered tulips with white starry flowers, usually 2-10 per stem with many local variants with proper species names. This stock was collected by me in NE part of Iran (Kuh-e Hazar Masjed ridge) in 2008 on rocky outcrops along valley inside mountains with dry stream bed in bottom.
3.00 EUR
 
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387
Quite tall growing form with up to 7 flowers on stem. Flowers white with small yellow throat, anthers black, filaments yellow, at top shaded orange.
3.00 EUR
 
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388
A part of the large and variable turkestanica/bifloriformis complex but it is perfectly distinct in the fresh state (rather than in dried herbarium specimens). This has lovely, up-facing, milky white blooms with a central yellow blotch in the centre. The anthers are also lemon yellow with the tiniest of purple tips and they are borne on yellow filaments. Each bulb can make 2-3 of its red-tinted scapes and each scape, though usually bearing a solitary flower, can branch holding 2-3 flowers each. This grows from stems around 15-20cm tall, This stock was collectedon dry sandy steppe not far from Alma-Ati, where it grew together with Tulipa behmiana.. Although it is a dry-land species, in cultivation I find it quite easy, well multiplying and setting seeds whilst T. behmiana alive only 2 seasons.
5.00 EUR
 
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389
In overall appearance similar and taxonomically close to T. fosteriana. It differs in foliage, which is keeled and more upward turned. Flowers are of more orange shade than usually seen in T. fosteriana. Collected very close to the locus classicus – in the heights of Sina valley in SE Uzbekistan.
10.00 EUR
 
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390
This tulip bears two or three, scented, flat star-shaped, clear yellow flowers on sturdy upright stems which have several long, narrow, folded in the center, twisted leaves. The tulip has been the favored spring bulb for centuries and originally my stock was introduced from Atlas Mountains in Morocco.
2.00 EUR
Not available
391
The stock comes from very high altitudes where it flowers in late May. The late flowering habit is maintained in the garden here where it flowers with golden yellow flowers a few weeks after the traditional Dutch stock has finished. Dwarf and with grey green leaves. The last picture is scanned slide from Kugart, where we collected it during search of Iris winkleri.
5.00 EUR
 
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392
Another multiflowered species of the Biflorus group quite similar to T. dasystemon but its flowers are bigger up to 3 per stem, they are white with large yellow base or sometimes yellow is completely absent. Stock was collected in Urungachsay, Ugam mnt. range, Uzbekistan at altitudes between 2500 - 2800 m.
5.00 EUR
 
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393
True species, very different from the Dutch stock. Dwarf with 2-3 wide, slightly undulate, greyish, sometimes almost purple leaves, flowers usually yellow with red suffused petal backs, but can be red, orange and even yellow-red striped.
4.00 EUR
 
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394
Flowers large, brilliant scarlet red, leaves greyish green, undulate. Some botanists regard this species as conspecific with the T. undulatifolia. Both are very different in the wild and in the cultivation, too. Our stock is raised from seed collected in Caucasus and is something variable in colour.
7.00 EUR
 
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395
Flowers with pointed tips bright purest yellow, only on the outside somewhat pinkish shaded, on 20-25 cm tall stems. Leaves keeled, plain green, sometimes waved. I believe that this species is available only from me.
5.00 EUR
 
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396
Very famous tulip species lying in pedigree of majestic Darwin Hybrids. The stock was collected during my 2nd trip to Central Asia in heights of river Agalik in Uzbekistan. Flowers are very bright red, variable in base colour (they are not selected clone). From all collected bulbs were selected those which split vegetatively, but no named clones were multiplied.
4.00 EUR
 
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